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Interviewing at the Bulgarian-Turkish Border

By Hanna Polishchuk

On our way from Bulgaria to Turkey we met again one boy that travelled with us in the same train just a couple of days ago from Serbia. We decided to introduce each other and to ask him about the trip. César Perales is a 25-year-old EVS volunteer from Spain currently living in Moldova.

On our last train we all witnessed how the police took several young boys out of the train when we were approaching the Bulgarian border. We thought that they might be refugees, so we began to discuss this topic with our new friend. Below you can find the outcome of our conversation.

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Have you ever been abroad? Have you ever taken part in any international project?

Yes, I visited most of the European countries. Sure, Erasmus in Italy, European Voluntary Service (EVS) in Moldova.

Was it hard to cross the border?

Just waiting many hours while crossing Transdniester, but in general it was easy and fast, especially in the Schengen area.

Have you ever applied for visa? Did you face any difficulties?

Yes, for Turkey. It was not difficult: I ordered it through internet and got it in 20 minutes. The price was 20 EUR, and that’s it.

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What do you think about the refugee crisis?

I think that Europe does not care too much about it. In my opinion, the borders should be opened, but of course there should be the same kind of control in every country. We need to care about refugees, and think how can we help them instead of closing borders in front of them.

I remember the first time when I met refugees. It was in Belgrade, Serbia. We were walking in a park, and at some point we noticed more and more people sitting on the ground and sleeping the street. Later we saw the house of the Red Cross and some other associations. There was also the sign in Arabic and English: “Welcome Refugees!” At this very moment I understood that those people are the ones who run from war in Syria. I was shocked because I did not expect to meet them just like this strolling in the park as a tourist.

The second time I met refugees was about a week ago in a train when I was travelling to Montenegro. As there were free seats near us, 7-8 young boys sat on them. In a while, one of them came to us asking if the train is going to Subotica, a Serbian city on the North. Unfortunately, it was not like this, we were going in the opposite direction. When they realised their mistake, they decided to get off on the next station. When they did, the police was already waiting for them outside. Probably the train controller informed them. The police took all boys somewhere, and since then I have no idea what happened to them.  

Do you think they were dangerous?

No, of course not. They were just like other people. They are running from the war. They were just worrying if they are going in the right way because they probably spent their last money in order to get this ticket. When those boys knew about their mistake, they became extremely sad. They spent lots of money for nothing.

What is your wish for Europe?

I hope for the better future of refugees. Europe has to do something in order to help them; the border should not be closed in front of people who need help. If Europe continues closing and tightening borders, then I don’t want to be a EU citizen.

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At some point our discussion was broken off; we were interrupted by a long stop. We looked at the window, and it was already deep night. The only thing we could see was a high fence with razor-wire fence. Suddenly, two men in military form came in for the passport control. We spent some time to cross the border. In order to receive the stamp on the passport we had to listen to some strange jokes from the control officer who said to our Russian team member: “Are you sure you want a Turkish visa stamp? It is a problem for the Russian passport. Are you sure? Haha!” Right after this interrogation, we went to the bus in order to get to Istanbul. We could not continue by train because the roads were under repairs but the bus trip was not very long, and in the early morning we were admiring the views of this beautiful Turkish city.